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been set aside from the budget to finance a high- speed rail projects throughout the united states. our next guest studies that as far as the rails concerned and what it does for job creation. his with the american transportation association and we will have that topic after this. >> american judge can be enclosed for spreading good will overseas debts >> i think so. over there, it is like a religion. they go over there and they live it. >> he was without question, the single most important figure in just in the 20th-century. >> q a date sunday on his biography on louis armstrong. >> to night, the history of executive power from george washington to george w. bush. this is part of our book tv weekend, on c-span 2. >> listen to cspan radio in washington at 90.1 fm. it is also if reapplication for your iphone. >> "washington journal" continues. host: our guest is the vice president for policy at the american transportation society. what does your association do text guest: they are at association of all the public transportation systems in the country and affiliated interests going back t
there is not dissimilar from the screening in the united states, and the screening that abdulmutallab went through was not that dissimilar. we want more explosive detection, more technology. other airports have resisted some of those items, because of other concerns that they have about privacy, for example. this incident is serving as a catalyst to reopen that dialogue, particularly with the airports and countries where we have a large throughput of passengers to the united states. >> i want to get back to that. i assume that there will be another round of questioning. i was shipped off of this to something else why have you here. we all know what has happened in haiti over the last seven to 10 days, it has been devastating. there is an issue about adoption potential, haiti children who had been left without parents. we have about five families here who have completed paperwork to get the children from haiti. and yet they are being held up. i need to get a commitment from you that the citizenship and immigration services will work with my office to help expedite our ability to get those kids out.
blames the united states and israel for the assassination of one of its nuclear scientists. the bomb attack now ratcheting up tensions and iran's nuclear standoff with the west. i'm wolf blitzer in cnn's command center, for breaking news, politics and extraordinary reports from around the world. you're in "the situation room." >>> all that coming up, but this just coming into "the situation room." a new breach of airline security, this time it's a potential health threat, not a terror threat. u.s. airways now confirms a person on the cdc's do not board list flew from philadelphia to san francisco on saturday. let's go to our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. what happened here? >> someone somewhere along the way dropped the ball. the way it words is the centers for disease control has a list of people who they think are basically a threat to public health, shouldn't be on a plane. this person was apparently on that list, the cdc gives the list to the tsa. the tsa is supposed to give that list to individual airlines, but something went wrong here. i find this next part a b
, the united states supreme court handed a huge victory to the special interests and lobbyists and a powerful blow to our efforts to rein and corporate influence. it's strikes at our democracy itself. by a 5-4 vote, the court overturned more than a century of law, including a bipartisan campaign finance lot written by john mccain and russ feingold that barred corporations from using the nato clout by running advertisements for or against candidates. this opens the floodgates for an unlimited amount of special interest money into our democracy. this gives the special interest lobbyists new leverage to spend millions on average -- on advertising, swaying voters to vote their way or punishing those who did not. that means any public servant who has the courage to stand up to special interest and stand up for the american people can find themselves under assault come election time. even foreign corporations can now get into the action. i cannot think of anything more devastating to the public interest. the last thing we need to do is hand more influence to the lobbyists in washington or more powe
heading to the united states, something our audience already was well familiar with. >> regarding the report specifically on the christmas incident, we were told by general jones that it would contain shocking information. as it turns out, i couldn't find anything new in there. what do we though about how much of it is still classified? >> reporter: we don't know how much remains classified. we may never know that. what we do know is this process today was delayed twice. the president was originally supposed to talk to us at 1:00 a.m., then 3 p.m ultimately it was 4:30 p.m why? because of a rather intensive debate about what to keep classified and what to declassify. what we do learn is that there was a fundamental break down in this new system of applied and created after 9-11. the c.i.a. and the national counterterrorism center are supposed to deal with each other and deal with each other rapidly and cooperatively. that didn't happen. let me read one key part of the report that talks about this break down. quote, the intentional redundancy in the system should have added an addi
and reconstruction of how we deliver primary secondary education in the united states. and that's exactly what this panel is going to be discussing. very interesting papers on exactly that point by john chubb and steve wilson. and two inspired discussants. and without further ado, let me just say the presenters have 12 minutes each, the discussants 10 minutes each and if everybody is brisk we will have time for some conversation and discussion. take it away, john chubb. >> good morning. this morning and in the first panel you heard about mostly operational savings. now we're going to switch to the topic of educational opportunities. the country for the last two years has been going through the worst recession since the great depression. and every industry has been under enormous, enormous pressure to change. education is not unique in that regard. i want to start with an example. to illustrate this. the state of hawaii, like many other -- every other state in the nation has been under enormous pressure to try to deal with its budget gaps. it came to the decision last summer that it would balan
that a nigerian was being prepared for attacks in the united states on the homeland. my understanding is the least one of those intersects i think there were several specifically mentioned umar farouk abdulmutallab, the first two names. if you put it together with the fact this suspect's own father and not just anyone off the street as it has been stated by some in the intelligence community but a respected nigerian banker went physically to the embassy and talked to not one agency but to, the department and central intelligence agency and wasn't in missing person report. he said he was conservative his son, he's in yemen, and the nsa intercepted background. follow those meetings with written communications and telephone calls. we know that yemen is a hotbed of terrorism. apparently intelligence community didn't receive a possibility al qaeda and the arab peninsula might attack the homeland which is the story is another failure of imagination and it seems al qaeda is fixation on aviation system all of it seems to me not just in retrospect but before the effect of to have been enough to put on high
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from american samoa, mr. faleomavaega, is recognized for one minute. mr. faleomavaega: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to speak for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. faleomavaega: madam speaker , it is my great honor and pleasure to welcome the reverend to the chamber today. reverend samuel, as he's properly known in our smowan community, is from -- samoan community, is from my home district in american samoa. he's part of the congregational christian church in american samoa. he was appointed secretary to the partnership consultation committee of the administrative initiative of the church of christ. he was ordained in the mid 1990's where he became pastor of the bread of life church in honolulu prior to becoming secretary of the ccas. to my knowledge he is the first american samoan to give the prayer to the house.
the united states and japan, between the foreign minister and secretary clinton. they're really starting to cement their relationship. i can sense the chemistry and the trust developing between the two. that's deeply gratifying. in addition, the secretary gave a speech really outlining -- to interact with asia when it comes to its fledgling international organizations. and so even though the trip was abriefiated, i think we got quite a bit of work done. as p.g.a. indicated, this is today we're marking the 50th anniversary of the u.s.-japan security alliance, the security partnership. it's no exaggeration to say that it has been the cornerstone and the foundation of everything that we've managed to accomplish over the course of the last few generations inin asia. and we hear this not just from japanese friends but throughout the region. over the course of the last couple of months, as the united states and japan worked together on a series of challenging matters, one of the things that's been most interesting and gratifying is how much we hear from other countries in the region, from sout
. >>> the president of the united states getting ready to address the nation from the white house. as soon as he goes to the microphone, you'll hear what he has to say on the failed terror attack in detroit, outside detroit on christmas day. we'll go there live, you'll hear everything. in the meantime, let's check in with jack cafferty. he has today's "cafferty file." >> some say it's past time to begin profiling passengers. the u.s. is demanding better koreaning from places like iran, pakistan, saudi arabia, yemen, the usual suspects. the screening is to include things like full body scans, patdowns, searches of carry-on bags, and explosive detection technology. from the school of common sense comes the idea it makes sense to more thoroughly screen passengers who come from cunning where they may have been exposed to radical islamic teaching, but improved technology isn't the answer. the head of security for el al, says we need better questioning of passengers. he suggests hiring well-educated, highly trained agents, who know what to look for. he says profiling isn't about single out certain ethnic g
of those who have been arrested, engaged in or having committed terrorist acts in the united states in the last month were in communication with persons on the internet. they never met the necessarily in person but they were highly influenced by their messaging. i gave a speech about a week ago really defending strongly internet freedom but i also pointed out that the internet is a neutral tool, and increasingly we are having to face, whether it is the u.s., u.k. or yemen, the threats coming from beyond our borders that cannot be, as david said come up ginned on any event in a particular place. it is an accumulation of influences, and i think we have to look more thoughtfully at this and i think there is a role for the free media to play because we need a countermessage to young people, who for whatever reason, seek out these voices of the extremism, and i think that is something that governments need help in doing on both a technological basis and in terms of the media's narrative. >> we will definitely take another question but thank you very much indeed. [laughter] >> on tomorrow
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the united states to have at least one corridor of substantial length that's served by a japanese or a european-style high-speed railroad? >> i think it's important that first off we wait and see what is applied for. you know, obviously i can't start commenting on what we're going to do until applications come forward and are weighed, you know, graded and then approved but clearly again i think we understand the need to ensure that we have very tangible, very, you know, substantial successes. and, you know, clearly again our vision is to follow the model of what the europeans have advanced. you know, keep in mind, when when the system in spain first opened up, you know, again ms. fleming talked about how essentially they begin with one trunk line, they did. they began with their one trunk line. essentially it was six to eight trains a day run being 125 miles an hour and from that they were so successful that they incrementally made the improvements that got them to roughly 20 trains a day at speeds of 200 miles an hour. so this is going to take a buildout, you know, a buildout muc
-span is a person under the law of the united states and constitutional holding. here is why -- if the fcc and fbi were to blow through these doors right now and turn off all the cameras and a subpoena your files, it would be c-span -- it cannot vote, it is not a citizen, and yet everyone would recognize that that is a fundamental violation of the rights of c-span. why? because at the end of the day, c-span, just like any other association of individuals, it is an association of the people that make up the entity. this is very important. we cannot skip past the idea that associations of individuals have their rights and keep it short shrift. have to be respected in a democratic republic. with regard to george sorus, campaign finance law requires them to spend independently all he wants, but the sec investigated import i believe two years for a book -- the fcc investigated him out for i believe two years for a book he wrote about george bush. if we are deciding if a book should be banned or if books are illegal or if books are not part of our debate, whether by george soros or any other individual,
, the united states and mexico into a trade zone. initially it did seem that some manufacturing was going to mexico, but a lot of those jobs in mexico actually ended up going to china and other parts of asia. i don't know. i guess it's argue ble -- argue -- arguable, those would have an impact on manufacturing in any case. and certainly technological change as factories become more automated they just use less workers. there are all sorts of arguments in that. host: minnesota, lynne democrat. caller: my name is duane. host: are you from minnesota? caller: yes. how comes the government don't want people in poverty to get out of poverty? host: what does that mean, dwayne? caller: i'm a disabled veteran and live with my mother or my mother lives with me. if i make any money over -- basically if i make any money they're going to cut my veteran pension completely. ok. i'm also on social security. ok. if i make over $800 a month they're going to cut my social security. so you can't make any money at all if you're sitting in a place like i am and me
and attention to the policies of freedom itself not only in the united states but around the world. for the first lecture we asked, is freedom for everyone? the speaker did so eloquently that our subsequent speakers have matched. we have heard from economic freedom, religious freedom, on whether the united nations advances the cause of freedom and the important relationship between security and freedom. advancing freedom is a major goal of the heritage foundation and important work that we do here. in fact tomorrow, we will release in hong kong and washington the 16th edition of the index of economic freedom. you will want to stay tuned because there is a bit of big and i'm afraid bad news in the index score for freedom in the united states. our speaker today is dr. charles krauthammer. on december 25, he described president obama's first year in office the year of living fec tilously. most of us know that he writes a column for the "washington post." less known is that he is a harvard educated medical doctor who was a resident of psychiatry at massachusetts general hospital. in 19
. they were not allowed to live with you in the united states because the authorities wouldn't let them scloc; is that right? >> that's right, it's actually an adoption case. we got approval for the adoption in the united states but haiti was really slow in the process. >> so you were going back and forth from the united states to spend time with your daughters. the earthquake hits, you don't know if they're alive or not. justin, you come into the picture. what happened? >> yes, sir. katie came to see me a-- kenned, we talked about what we needed to do and i tried to assist her with small things, getting assistance on the ground and i helped her in what i could. the small things started to become larger things. it was such a compelling story. you look into the eyes of a distraught mother, you want to do nothing more than help. so there was a moment where i just said, kennedy, i want to come with you. and when she agreed to let me come, the journey began. it was a very arduous one, but it had a happy ending. >> kennedy, how did you get to haiti from texas. >> we booked a flight to the dominica
that are due here, bound here for the united states and, of course, also that intelligence review under way to take into account all of the different agencies and, david, they're all going to meet here tuesday in the situation room after the president returns from his vacation. the president is going to hear from them in person individually. david? >> speaking of the situation room, people may be confused. when we report on events, this bombing in pakistan, 40 killed at a volleyball tournament, how does information go from the situation room to the president? is there somebody who essentially represents the situation room with the president in hawaii, who keeps the president up to speed? >> reporter: the president has a full complement of staff with him in hawaii. of course another entity that has come under fire here was created after 9/11 by an upshot of the committee recommendations, the national terrorism center, that is supposed to assimilate all the information and connect the dots, a phrase we're hearing again in the last few days as we heard after 9/11. all the information we're tal
began to invade iraq. remember that? only a month later, the congress of the united states voted to allow president bush to invade and occupy iraq. we now are in a second phase of the gop propaganda blitz, and it is even worse this time. this time the folks in massachusetts are the target. i'm a texan, i'm a democrat from texas, a state where we don't have a single democratic statewide official, which is directly opposite massachusetts. if you vote against the democratic candidate today, you will be joining the republicans in their attempt to bring down this obama administration and possibly even the united states government. host: open but the houston chronicle," home state paper has this front-page story -- "the houston chronicle." host: raleigh, north carolina, jim on the republican line. caller: thank you. i would just have to counter fred's argument and say that perhaps this election is somewhat like the shot heard around the world, the first election where the american populace and the voters are going to stand up and say no to the obama socialism machine. i just watch with
in yemen is an organization that can reach out and touch the united states. that's a major reason general david petraeus went to yemen over the weekend and met with the president there and took messages and we are told pieces of information, and that's a direct quote from a senior u.s. official. pieces of information to president obama. the bottom line they are talking about targeting al qaeda. general petraeus made rare open remarks about yemen over the weekend. >> it's a country that has a lot of challenges. the reduction in oil production, although gas is going up, thankfully. many of the challenges of countries that are in the process of development, rugged terrain, tribal areas and so forth. and so very important, indeed, that yemen has taken the actions that it has, and indeed that not just the united states, but countries in the region, its neighbors and so forth have provided significant assistance. >> what comes next, heidi? yemen has taken actions. there will be more sharing of intelligence and more targeting information, and more training and equipping of yemenen security force
of this country that elected me, an african-american as the 44th president of the united states of america. rev. wheeler mentioned the inauguration. on the heels of that victory over one year ago, some suggested that somehow we had entered into a post-racial america. all those problems would be solved. there are those who argued that because i had spoke of a need for unity in this country that our nation was somehow entering into a period of post- partisanship. that did not work out so well. there was a hope shared by many that life would be better from the moment that i swore that oath. of course, as we meet here today, one year later, we know the promise of that moment has not yet been fully fulfilled. because of an era of greed and irresponsibility that sowed the seeds of its own demise, because of persistent economic troubles unaddressed through the generations, because of the banking crisis that has brought the financial system to the brink of catastrophe, we are being tested in our own lives and as a nation as you have been tested before. unemployment is at its highest level in more than
. >>> and united states and great britain closing their embassies in yemen, citing a specific, credible ongoing threat from al qaeda. it's unclear how long the embassies will remain closed. is yemen the new front in the war on terror? we're live in dubai with our security watch this morning. >>> we begin with tough new security measures facing every passenger flying to america from 14 high-risk nations, those nations are considered sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest by the transportation security administration. the new rules take effect this morning. our homeland security correspondent jean mene meserve live. >> reporter: all passengers on flights heading into the united states will be subject to random screening, and those flying in from certain countries will be required to go through enhanced screenings, such as full-body pat-downs, carry on bag searches, full body scanning and explosive detection swabs, this according to a new security directive issued by the transportation security administration, and now in effect. the countries include those that are officially listed by the
you paid in the united states? also, canada and mexico. i understand canadian wages are much higher. guest: i would really need to bring the manufacturing teams to talk about the wage structure. they are probably the right expert on the topic. in general, we are focused on building great cars, trucks, and crossovers. we have a number of examples where we are building some small cars in the u.s. is clearly a competitive environment out there. we are comparing the wage structure. i would say the salt salt [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> "washington journal" talked to several representtives of several car companies this morning. they are in washington, d.c.. next a look at ford motor company. put out by this restaurant, and they have given you the "don't give up the ship" award. what have you done that has led to your decision not needing government money? guest: the most important thing is we had a plan we were working on. we've got financing a bit earlier than others as well. we were able to see what was coming. i think we are proud of the fact we did not t
interview, the strategy of the united states government is to prevent the president from being overthrown. there's a secessionist movement going on there. internally there's a huge urban youth goal and on top of it, people don't have jobs. yemen is feared to become a failed state like somalia. when you see ohio it's gene graphically positioned between somalia and yemen, it's a vice that the united states just can't let happen. >> all right, so listen, is this a precursor to anything that we should be concerned about, especially as americans? >> i think it is, because what we have right now is really good diplomacy going on because they're trying to establish legitimacy with the government of yemen and with the arab street because these bombings are going to happen, and legitimacy is going to be half the battle. the other part of it is going to be proper target selection of legitimate targets that have had to do with either giving sanctuary to al qaeda or threatening the survival of the state of yemen, and we have to avoid collateral damage in the process. >> ken, what i'm really asking is
was the ultimate threat to the united states was when the worst weapons fell into the hands of the worst people. that led congress to create our commission to evaluate what is our level of preparation to avoid the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly into the hands of terrorists. so it was appropriate that we started the day by giving back to the beginnings of this effort with families 9/11. our report on today comes eight years after 9/11. it comes one year after the publication of the report which was entitled world at risk, purposefully titled to indicate this is not one nation's problem, this is a global problem because it is the earth which is at risk, and one month after the failed attempt at an aviation bombing on christmas day there is some good news. the good news is particularly in the area of nuclear terrorism that the trend lines here seem to be running in the right direction. president obama has taken major steps to revitalize the non-proliferation regime and to encourage needed international cooperation. he's committed significant time and energy and resource
with colorado district attorney and united states attorney in colorado to ensure the cases were pursued by the most effected meaned. my office focused on enforcement by deceptive advertising on local borrowers and egregious cases. we examined the advertising of dozens loan originators for act violations. seize and assist letters went to those advertisers who were not disclosing an apr or who are disclosing inaccurate apr. by late 2006, our newspapers were full with option payment a.r.m. loan. they failed to disclose the borrowers would experience if they made over the minimum payment. they were led to believe they were buying a fixed-interest rate when only the first monthly payment was at the advertised rate. we issue subpoenas and conducted numerous depositions. the witness told us the teaser rates really quote, made the phones light up, unquote. it was clear that thousands of colorado borrowers got into the loan without knowing the true nature, the significant negative amityization that they were added and the penalties that came with the loan. a number went out of business. we reach
of the united states of america certainly is very sympathetic to the marxism and communism and he is going to suffer because of that. but for these extraordinary and provides a different genealogy of black power. people like william worthy, richardson who was the activist from cambridge maryland who really was called the leedy general of the civil rights movement who waged an unprecedented struggle in cambridge maryland and 63 and 64 to help desegregate the city, met with attorney general robert f. kennedy to sign a peace accord in the early 1960's but also goes to malcolm x's nov grassroots leadership conference in detroit where malcolm delivers his famous message to the grassroots where he lays out a secular vision of domestic national but also international global political revolution. >> host: you read malcolm x was nothing less than a civil rights era's invisible man. >> absolutely. in the terms of the way which historians view malcolm x, malcolm isn't part of that heroic work of the civil rights movement. he usually only pops up are not 1963, 64 and serves as a foil to dr. king. he's
in the united states and elsewhere and the vietnam war that was fought on the ground if the whole of the vietnam and communist, the rest would quickly follow. the so-called domino effect. as it happened the dominoes fell not in asia in the 1970's but eastern europe in 1989. we shouldn't forget either that thanks largely to the huge population of china, more than one-fifth of humanity still live under what may be regarded as communist rule. up until 1989 there were 16 communist states as i would define them. oddly there are 36 countries today which were at one time communist. that contradiction is to be explained by the fact the soviet union, one state broke up and became 15 states and czechoslovakia and yugoslavia also broke up so there'll be were 16 communist states but there were 36 countries that were communist and today there are five common is countries, china, vietnam, laos, north korea and cuba. the first three have been developing market economies on a substantial private sectors. the hybrid regimes, political economist economically not. china has been described as a state of party cabal
people flying into the united states will face tough new security measures. the tsa saying enhanced screening will focus on people flying through countries of interest such as yemen, pakistan and nigeria. the enhanced techniques include full-body patdowns, body scans and thorough searches of carry-on luggage. >>> 2010, as we were saying, good morning to you earlier, it has turned out already fairly deadly for the united states and its allies in afghanistan. nato saying four u.s. service members died in a roadside bomb yesterday. a british soldier was killed in a separate explosion. last year was the bloodiest for coalition forces since the war in afghanistan started. 514 service members died. united states has started deploying 30,000 more troops to fight the taliban. >>> look at this image that we found hanging off a building in former president jimmy carter's hometown of plains, georgia. witnesses told affiliate walb it's an effigy of president obama with a rope around its neck. and one person says it had a sign with the president's name on it. the secret service is now investigat
targets in yemen, but the united states, itself. >> the president made it clear where the fault lies for the failed attack on christmas day. >> this was not a failure to collect intelligence. it was a failure to integrate and understand the intelligence that we already had. >> reporter: today's meeting comes as the administration finds itself on the defensive about how it initially handled the incident. >> sadly, the president is judged more on his public relations than on his governing. >> reporter: the challenge for the administration is clear -- >> terrorists only have to be lucky or successful once. we have to be successful every single time. that is an incredibly high standard, but one we should aspire to. >> reporter: and the president indicated just that. >> the margin for error is slim. the consequences of failure can be catastrophic. >> reporter: brian, the president also confirmed publically that the united states would no longer release any guantanamo bay detainees of yemeni descent back to their home country. guantanamo bay may not shut down for another two years. >> chuc
's to the united states. look at the babies taking care of babies. that bus had to turn around. the state department is allowing children with adoptions in process, already, to get temporary visas. officials will not accept kids if they cannot verify their paperwork is in order. such desperation. >>> california is getting another beating from the weather today. there's a state of emergency in parts of the state. hundreds are wait iing for evacuations to be lifted after the mud slides. in san diego, the longer the rain came down, the worse things got. >> this was a river. it was a river. it literally was a river. >> it was draining very well, even in the heavy rain. the pumps -- something must have stopped or part of them. the rain stopped and the water started backing up. >> conditions are bad now, but you may get a break from the rain soon. bob van dillen is keeping an eye on things. good morning. >> good morning. i want to start with the big picture. a couple storms are out there. the one from yesterday is back inland around idaho and nevada. you can see the frontal boundary as it exten
and in the south american countries compared to what you paid in the united states? also, canada and mexico. i understand canadian wages are much higher. guest: i would really need to bring the manufacturing teams to talk about the wage structure. they are probably the right expert on the topic. in general, we are focused on building great cars, trucks, and crossovers. we have a number of examples where we are building some small cars in the u.s. is clearly a competitive environment out there. we are comparing the wage structure. i would say the manufacturing side would be the best to answer the question. host: the general manager for chevrolet. thank you. more guests coming from the washington auto show. we will speak to representatives of florida and bmw. -- ford and bmw. mike from pennsylvania. no guest right now, but do you have a comment? caller: yes, i was a longtime fan of the pontiac division. i see the discontinued and that -- they discontinued that. that upsets me a little bit. how come they cannot focus more on environmentally-friendly vehicles? host: abilene, texas. lou on the repu
, salute them at cnn.com/robin. >>> haitian immigrants are allowed in the united states to get medicare. ordinarily there's a lot of paperwork and delay involved. some of that is set aside after the earthquake in haiti t. rule change is temporary to make sure there's medical care for orphans in the pipeline to be adopted. >>> an iowa couple trying to adopt two haitian orphans saw one alive on tv. they spent the last two years going through the adoption red tape. >> beautiful. praise god. praise god. >> now, the couple just learned they can get one child this week. they are applying for a humanitarian visa to bring the second child here. >>> a grot broken through a strip club. a goat. >> myself on the surveillance tapes, i wouldn't have believed it, either. >> the goat spent 30 minutes staring at one thing inside the strip club. that story is new for you this hour. >> you dirty goat, you. >>> more money has been raised for the victims of haiti's earthquake than in the wake of hurricane katrina. jennifer westhoven is here now. i think a lot of it has to do with the ease of the texting giv
, but it needs to change in the entire united states as well. remember reverend right? he tried to explain this to america. republicans, you know what i was always taught? you call people liars, but i was always taught that it takes one to no one. go to your church and talked your creatures, who are not giving you the right training as far as how you should be as a person in america. thank you. host: news from the associated press, "bill gates is planning to give $10 billion to research vaccines over the next decade. also, there is a report that a osama bin laden, in a new video -- audio tape, has called for the world to abandon the u.s. dollar, blaming industrialized companies -- countries for global warming. the numbers are out for how many unions watched the state of the union, slipping down from last year. 48 million people tune in across 11 networks, but viewership is down from his address to the joint session of congress last february. the numbers are up from the first official address by george w. bush after the 9/11 terrorist attack. -- "as latter-day state of the union addresses g
on the national mall where the president of the united states, of course, would be taking the oath of office on january 20th and addressing the world with his inaugural address. they took it quite seriously in the last 48 to 72 hours before the inauguration. increasingly they were picking up signs that made them feel like this was a serious and possible threat. they met repeatedly with each other. old team, the bush team, the new team, the obama team, during this transition period in order to figure out what to do about it. it was a moment of quiet tension there for a new president who was just about to take office. >> i understand president obama canceled a rehearsal of the inauguration. when was the president actually briefed? do you know what his reaction was. >> caller: he was kept up to date in the few days leading up to the inauguration. there was one moment in particular we write about in the magazine, the night before the inauguration, his counterterrorism adviser john brennan and a couple foreign policy advisers jump into the limousine with him as he's heading off to an inaugural ev
call within the united states. the number is 877-742-5751. we will be right back. so many arthritis pain relievers -- i just want fewer pills and relief that lasts all day. take 2 extra strength tylenol every 4 to 6 hours?!? taking 8 pills a day... and if i take it for 10 days -- that's 80 pills. just 2 aleve can last all day. perfect. chptse aleve and you can be taking four times... fewer pills than extra strength tylenol. just 2 aleve have the strength to relieve arthritis pain all day. who's not answering. announcer: there's a better way. intuit quickbooks online p9 organizes your business in one place, and helps you stay on top of your business anytime, anywhere. get a 30-day free trial at intuit.com. >>> welcome back. i'm rick sanchez here in the world headquarters of cnn. i told you from the start that this is a story that would not go away and now there is some very bad news for gilbert arenas of the washington wizards. the website tmz is reporting it is not one gun that arenas had in his locker and not one gun or two guns or three guns, but four guns. including one that is d
heard screaming for help across the region. haiti's ambassador to the united states told katie couric on evening news tonight that the damage is significant and that haiti the world's most impoverished needs the world's help. a tsunami watch is in effect right now for haiti, cuba, the bahamas and the dominican republic. most communications are down but first-hand reports are hard to come by. that said, we have been able to get in touch with joel trimble, a missionary in the town of thomason in haiti. can you describe the scene for us, sir. >> in is the worst decimation i have ever seen. i have never seen anything in haiti in the 34 years i have been here to this effect. the house i'm in on the mott rocked. i thought it was going to fall over. the vehicle in the driveway was rocking like there was five guys trying to push it over and now there is a cloud of dust over the city of port-au-prince. >> shepard: you went out on a motorcycle after the initial quake. there have been a number of aftershocks to follow, but you went out on a motorcycle. tell us what you saw, place to place? >> lo
in criminal court inside the united states. we're going to have a huge expense no matter whether it's in lower manhattan or some place else. >> bill: enormous state expense because the supreme court has ruled. >> unnecessary. the military tribunals. >> bill: says the military can handle. this right. >> bill: here is my question. is this going to damage president obama further or is it enough to say, wow, we'll find another place? >> bill, look, the longer this goes on, the more the american people say why are we doing this? unnecessary, expensive. gives the terrorist what is they want which is big gigantic public platform to attack the united states of america. the longer it goes on, the worse it is for the country and the worse it is for the administration. >> bill: i do think that the media is consciously underreporting this story tonight. i don't think you will see it on many other broadcasts. president obama out today trying to convince republicans to cooperate with him. that was one of his themes in the state of the union address that the republicans are the party of no. here is what mr.
-rights organizer in the deep south. born in trinidad in 1941. emigres to the united states two weeks before his 11th birthday 1952. lives in the bronx. one of the only african-american students that test into the bronx science high school that is one of the most prestigious high schools. even as a high school student come he is an activist. 1960 he unrolls howard university and joins the nonviolent action group which is a affiliate of snic and becomes a free director and is arrested in mississippi and spent 49 days in the worst prison farm and he celebrates his 20th birthday in prison with civil-rights activity that is the first-ever 27 arrest but what is really important about stokely carmichael that i tried to convey a is carmichael is one of the few americans domestically who actually pleads for democracy. undergoing physical terror and violence at the hands of hate to groups and domestic terrorist like the mississippi delta and in cambridge merrill lynch to promote poaching rights in sitters and share price for all african-americans. >> host: we're getting close to the break time and i want to
is back in the united states today, cora lee suffered head and spinal cord injuries and people who saw the building fall dug her out an she was on a stretcher when she arrived at fort lauderdale airport in a sandy to the search for an american physical therapist missing in the quake, the family of 22-year-old molly hightower says her body was pulled from the rubble this morning. the washington state native was in haiti, volunteering with the group friends of the or fans, a second american volunteer also killed in that statement building, a mass is scheduled today at the high school, high tower graduated from, in 2005. the united states is taking the lead in the rescue and relief efforts on the ground in haiti and it is not an easy task with so much of that country so devastated. just minutes ago, the state department held a briefing updating us on the situation. on the ground and what is being done to get americans out of the country. mike emmanuel is in washington and what is the state department saying about the challenges that americans are finding there, mike? >> john, the state de
back and forth. and exports from the united states has increased quite a bit. this year and one month we had sort of a setback. that is common because the numbers are released you a lot by borrowing. they shipped and plans one month and won the next, and that can make a big difference in the trade figures for that one month. it is a general trend, exports are rising pretty strongly. that is pretty good news for the american worker because it means maybe we are becoming more competitive and maybe we can sell more things. >> host: to job creation. carol, republican. good morning. >> caller: yes. i have a question in regards to the health care affects on new job creation and what it will do to the job economy. one of the questions i have, their is a lot of corruption in the city of chicago, and a lot of the newspapers. husband has been in jail for a couple years. while he was in jail for embezzlement and corruption he wrote the book that is the foundation of health care. is that the same? thank you. >> guest: to that health care. make the broader connection. it is really rough. a lot of
to the united states and the obama administration argues by keeping it open it's not only a propaganda tool but a tool that al-qaeda and its various allyies -- although is used to encourage attacks on the united states like the kind on christmas day. the united states says it's committed to closing guantanamo but the timeline is more extended than the president originally hoped. he originally set a january 10 meeting, as the deadline but it's clear it will not be closed before 2011 at the earlier. jon: i know the administration doesn't like the phrase war on terror but if there is a war on terror going on, yemen seems to be the new front, is that right? >> it is a newer front, as far as public perception. the administration would argue it has been focused on yemen since it arrived here, as was the bush administration to a certain degree. david petraeus, head of central command, was on yemen on saturday, john brennan told chris wallace he had been twice this year and yes, the administration is trying to beef up its counterterrorism to the yemeni government. one concession, if the united stat
is born in trinidad. emigres he immigrates to the united states two weeks before his 11th birthday in 1952. he lives in the bronx. he is one of the only african-american students who tests in to the high school in 1956. that is one of the most prestigious high schools in your city. even as the high schools in he is an activist. by 1963 enrolls in howard university . and really stokely carmichael becomes a freedom rider and is arrested in mississippi. he really celebrates his 20th birthday in prison for civil-rights activity. that is going to be the first of 27 arrests between 1961 and 1966. what is really important about stokely carmichael that i tried to convey in this book is that carmichael is one of the few americans domestically during the 1960's who actually believes would democracy. but i mean by that is undergoes physical peril and violence as the hands of hate groups and really domestic terrorists in places like the mississippi delta, in alabama, in cambridge, maryland, in washington, d.c. to promote voting rights and citizenship rights for all african-americans. >> host: i want t
here and to try to make it more amenable for companies like yours to create jobs in the united states? >> well, obviously, we're in the united states for the talent that is there and also the association with where our rnd departments are in new york state. new york state made it attractive years ago for us to look at that as a region to put manufacturing in place based on taxes, based on incentives, based on r&d. so the united states needs to keep focusing in on that and to leverage that innovation network that always has been there via the universities and the companies that are there. many of our major customers are based in the united states. many of the fabulous companies that we'll serve, many of the 150 -- >> do they need tax incentives, things like that? >> absolutely. tax incentives, making sure that we can have the best and brightest remain there and not leave our shores to go. but as a global company, we're in the united states, we're in europe, and we're in asia for the purposes to locate where our customers are, but also to have access to the best .brightest around the wo
. >> as of now, all passengers on flights headed into the united states will be subject to random screening, not the intensive screening that's been in place since christmas day. those flying from certain countries or with passports from those countries will be required to go through enhanced screening that could include full body pat-downs, scanning and explosive detection swabs. this according to a new directive and now in effect. the countries include those that are listed by the state department as sponsoring terrorism -- cuba, iran, sudan and syria. the other countries were chosen because of concerns particularly about al qaeda affiliates. they are afghanistan, algeria, iraq, lebanon, libya, nigeria, pakistan and yemen. pilots on in-bound flights can prevent passengers from keeping pillows and blankets in their laps and to limit movement in the cabin. the president's top counter terrorism adviser fanned out across the talk shows sunday to say though there were lapses in sharing intelligence prior to attempted christmas attack there is no smoking gun. he rejected comparisons to the fail
government, the united states government, by $1.9 trillion. and as the senator from new hampshire very well pointed out, we are looking at deficits now into the forseeable future that exceed $1 trillion. in fact, it doesn't look like for the ten-year window that we do budgeting here in the united states senate that we're ever going to have a year where we don't have a deficit somewhere in the $1 trillion range. we looked at a $1.4 trillion last year, looking at another $1.2 trillion deficit for this year. at some point we just keep racking up more and more debt that gets passed on to future generations and future taxpayers. and as the senator from new hampshire pointed out, admission into the european union, there are a couple of key thresholds. one is debt as a percentage of g.d.p., which is 60%, is the threshold for admission into the european union. and deficits to g.d.p., which is about 3%, and as he also pointed out very effectively, we are at thresholds here in this country which exceed dramatically the deficit the to g.d.p. threshold that wouldn't even allow us to get into the europe
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